Lyrebirds of Baw Baw National Park

Date published: 27 Jul 2018 - Written by Jasmin - Filed under victoria

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The elusive lyrebird crossed our path seven times today. We got to see and hear this amazing natural mimic live and up close in the forests of Baw Baw National Park.

Snow on the way up to the rocks

Snow on the way up to the rocks with mountain ash and fern trees

The lyrebird is an amazing creature that can imitate any kind of sound it’s exposed to – including other birds. So while walking through a forest, you may think you hear a cockatoo, magpie or whip bird, but what you’re really hearing is a lyrebird. They can even imitate man-made sounds, like chainsaws, gun shots, babies, mobile phone jingles - you name it.

Roots growing into the rocks

Roots growing into the rocks

Between June and August, lyrebirds crank up the volume on their singing in preparation for breeding. That’s what we were privileged to witness and hear today. Three lyrebirds sang their hearts out as we hiked up from Mt Erica car park to Mushroom Rocks. It was pretty amazing to stop and listen to their song – kind of like a compilation of 80’s bird hits.

Mushroom rock monoliths

Mushroom rock monoliths

The hike up to Mushroom Rocks is a short one, and follows the Australian Alpine Walking Track (AAWT), giving you a good taste of what you can expect on the 680 km trail.

Demonstrating the scale of the rocks

Demonstrating the scale of the rocks

The rocks are giant granite tors that form a natural temple. It’s one of the first camp sites for hikers doing the AAWT after leaving Walhalla. Some of the rocks are shaped like a mushroom, a natural phenomenon caused by wind and erosion (and not by eating magic mushrooms). On the way up, we hit the snow line and got a taste of Victorian snow for the first time.

Native flowers blossom in winter

Native flowers blossom in winter

Australian Alps Walking Track marker

Australian Alps Walking Track marker

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