Wild cave tour at Mole Creek

Posted by Jasmin on Aug 07, 2021

Our first trip into the Mole Creek Karst system was an unforgettable one!

The Mole Creek Karst National Park consists of several small parcels scattered around the Mole Creek area. My daily running route up at Westmorland Falls is also the location of Westmorland Cave. The infamous Mole Creek that originates from Westmorland Falls flows through Westmorland Cave and also Wet and Honeycomb Caves respectively, which are both located further down the hill at the Mole Creek Karst National Park campground.

This campground just outside Mole Creek is one of our usual weekly haunts. We’ve become acquainted with both caves through our frequent overnighting at the campground and exploration of their respective entrances. We’ve been careful not to go too deep into the caves, instead keeping a safe but curious distance. After discovering the back part of Honeycomb Cave, which is accessible by walking around the side of the hill, hidden sink holes and mini canyons covered by lush ferny rainforest and untouched by wild fire, have been magically revealed. So it was really only a matter of time before our curiosity needed total fulfilment.

Having done yoga in the same class as local cave expert Deb Hunter for almost a year, it was only logical to organise a group tour with her for my Map of Tassie outdoor club. Six women signed up for a half day tour of Honeycomb Cave and the rest, as they say, is history. It was basically love at first sight. What had previously been only seen from above ground, was now discovered up close and personal below the surface. And what a stunning and tantalising underworld it was. We crawled through tiny holes in walls to enter narrow corridors, where we hung over the flowing waters of Mole Creek, and then dropped down into the lower levels of the subterranean world to marvel at the reflective pools, mud, rocks, shawl formations and fossils.

The tour was a true adventure with Deb patiently guiding us through the beautiful Karst world, and opening our eyes to the abundance of life right under our feet and literally at our doorstep. It seemed only fitting to learn that Honeycomb Cave is a secret women’s site for the local Pallitore band of Tasmanian Aboriginals.

Honeycomb Cave

The mob of women before entering the cave

Rainbow over the Tiers

The Tiers with a stunning rainbow display

Rainbow over the Tiers

Deb explaining the inner world of Honeycomb

Rainbow over the Tiers

Cave forms

Rainbow over the Tiers

More cave forms

Rainbow over the Tiers

Flow stone forms

Rainbow over the Tiers

Even more flow stone forms

Rainbow over the Tiers

Light from the surface

Rainbow over the Tiers

Crawling through tiny holes

Rainbow over the Tiers

Hanging over Mole Creek

Rainbow over the Tiers

One very happy group of women

Rainbow over the Tiers

Some has been bitten by the cave bug

Rainbow over the Tiers

Creek running through

Rainbow over the Tiers

Dropping down to a lower level

Rainbow over the Tiers

Sliding down narrow muddy passages

On secret women's business

Secret women’s business

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